The Girl With The Lower Back Tattoo + The Particular Sadness Of Lemon Cake

February 2, 2017

Hello reader friends. Two book reviews for you today. As I’ve mentioned before, there is always some strange commonality between the books I read back to back that I only end up realizing when I go to write their paired reviews. This time it’s in the author’s names, something I realized only seconds ago.

Ms. Schumer’s book is, sadly, the last memoir I’ll be reading for awhile (focusing on fiction while writing fiction)–but it was a pleasure to read. The other Amy book is a brilliant work of fiction.

Their reviews below. As always, they are spoiler free.

Happy reading! And thank you to those who recommended these books!

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1. The Girl With The Lower Back Tattoo.

If You’re Looking For: Humor, memoir, pop culture read

If You Like: Celebrity memoirs, the person Amy Schumer

My Review: I liked this book. It had enough funny parts and well written essays to make it worth my time and I was excited to sit down and read it every night. It wasn’t my favorite celebrity memoir by any means (its own genre now, it seems), but I like Amy and if you do too, I think you’d enjoy this book as well. You will not enjoy this book if you find Amy Schumer annoying, don’t enjoy celebrity memoirs, or think vagina jokes are for sinners. There isn’t really much more to say.

Their Review: “Beyond the many powerful and empowering takeaways of The Girl with the Lower Back Tattoo—from loving the hustle to self-love—perhaps the most overlooked is that of a woman’s right to not only make mistakes, but to make art out of them.” –Salon

Quoted: I’m of the belief that in most industries, women have to work twice as hard to get half the credit. After putting in so much effort to make a good movie, it felt pretty demeaning when they called it a “female comedy.” This meaningless label painted me into a corner and forced me to speak for all females, because I am the actual FEMALE who wrote the FEMALE comedy and then starred as the lead FEMALE in that FEMALE comedy. They don’t ask Seth Rogen to be ALL MEN! They don’t make “men’s comedies.” They don’t ask Ben Stiller, “Hey, Ben, what was your message for all male-kind when you pretended to have diarrhea and chased that ferret in Along Came Polly?

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2. The Peculiar Sadness Of Lemon Cake.

If You’re Looking For: Strange fiction, great writing, magical realism

If You Liked: The Rabbit Back Literature Society

My Review: Before I tell you what I thought of this book, I’ll say this: I like a lot of books most people like and love a lot of books most people hate. The best example of this is my favorite book, Oryx and Crake by my favorite author, Margaret Atwood. Whenever I pass this book along to friends, the reaction is 20% “that was okay” and 80% “what did I just read.” And that’s okay! I stand by the idea that our reviews of books, tv, and movies are subjective and reflect nothing more than our little opinions and not some larger truth (this is me saying it’s fine to watch The Bachelor and love it). The Peculiar Sadness Of Lemon Cake has gotten very mixed reviews. A lot of readers say it is too strange. But I happen to like strange, and I loved this book. Simple, moving, and the kind of writing I can only dream of. Every thought is so clear and lovely that it’s almost as if Aimee wrote this novel over and over until each phrase reflected its exact meaning. Five out of five stars and added to my favorite book list. An outstanding work of fiction.

Their Review:  “Bender is the master of quiet hysteria. . . . She builds pressure sentence by sentence. . . . A little hiss of steam comes off the novel.” —Los Angeles Times

Quoted: I didn’t mind the quiet stretches. It was like we were trying out the idea of being side by side.

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3 thoughts on “The Girl With The Lower Back Tattoo + The Particular Sadness Of Lemon Cake

  1. Jo R

    What annoyed me most about the particular sadness of lemon cake (besides the strange, stupid [to me] ending) was that it turned from tasting feelings (the concept of which i really liked) into being able to taste what factory something was made at?? That really, really annoyed me.

    Reply
  2. Amanda

    I heard Jack Gantos speak and he said after he finishes writing a book, he rereads the whole thing for specific edits at least 8 times (and to think I thought I was crazy in college for reading my papers like a million times before turning them in!).

    All that to say, maybe Aimee does too!

    And while we’re talking about Jack Gantos, have you read Dead End in Norvelt? It’s my favorite of his.

    Reply

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